March 15, 2013

What We've Been Reading: So Many Email Pet Peeves

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123 Print blog: Top 9 Email Pet Peeves and How to Avoid Them -- We all have email pet peeves. And unfortunately, there'll be people who just poke at them until breaking point. This post only lists nine of them
9. Unnecessary Emails

Unnecessary emails come in all shapes, sizes, colors and flavors - and they can often cross over with other email pet peeves listed below - but the one thing that they all have in common is that what they communicate either did not need to be communicated or at least did not need to be communicated with the immediacy of an email.

How To Avoid It - If it's not something that your recipients absolutely need to have and have right away; or something that you can just mention in passing or at an upcoming meeting, then skip the email.

Dot Complicated: Your Email Pet Peeves and E-mail Etiquette Tips From Ed Zuckerberg

Bad (Or No) Subject Lines


The absolute worst is getting an email with no subject line. Uh, really? You are that lazy? - Susan


Too Short

Shorthand abbreviations when they are not needed. It's not Twitter, you have more than 140 characters. Make them count! - Neha @Nehalia


One word responses. Oh the humanity. - Randall @RandallAllDay



Slate: You Say "Best." I Say No.It's time to kill the email signoff -- Matthew Malady brings about a good point: that signoffs have been grandfathered into the email era. They have, but are they still necessary? The Dot Complicated post also mentions the dislike of closing an email with "Best," so there's definitely some animosity out there. Definitely an interesting read.

After 10 or 15 more "Regards" of varying magnitudes, I could take no more. I finally realized the ridiculousness of spending even one second thinking about the totally unnecessary words that we tack on to the end of emails. And I came to the following conclusion: It's time to eliminate email signoffs completely. Henceforth, I do not want--nay, I will not accept--any manner of regards. Nor will I offer any. And I urge you to do the same.



Think about it. Email signoffs are holdovers from a bygone era when letter writing--the kind that required ink and paper--was a major means of communication. The handwritten letters people sent included information of great import and sometimes functioned as the only communication with family members and other loved ones for months.